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Venable partner Seth Rosenthal was quoted in a January 24, 2013 Daily Record article on a recent ruling by the Maryland Court of Appeals ordering the Maryland State Police to release records of racial profiling complaints. Since many of the records contain personal information and names, the court ruled the records could be released under the Maryland Public Information Act as long as the personal information was redacted.

“No one has ever been able to see what the state police does to investigate police that are racially profiling,” said Rosenthal commenting on the significance of the ruling. “Today changes all that …It’s a really great ruling for the principle of open government.” The matter involved a 10-year legal battle between the NAACP and the state police after which a federal court in 2003 issued a consent order requiring the police to investigate racial profiling complaints and submit quarterly reports. In 2007, the NAACP filed public information requests to determine if the police were complying with the order. “Part of the consent decree was intended to make sure when the state police receive complaints, they were meaningfully addressed and investigated,” Rosenthal said. “The only way to ensure that was happening was to actually see the records.”